U.S. President-elect Donald Trump addresses supporters during his election night rally in New York.  REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump addresses supporters during his election night rally in New York. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Hillary Clinton won the 55 electoral votes of California Tuesday, but she nevertheless conceded the election to Donald Trump.

CNN called the Golden State for Clinton seconds after the state’s polls closed at 8 p.m. The victory was expected as California is solidly in the Democratic column with every statewide office holder being a Democrat.

Republican Donald Trump stunned the world by defeating heavily favored Clinton, ending eight years of Democratic rule and sending the United States on a new, uncertain path.

A wealthy real-estate developer and former reality TV host, Trump rode a wave of anger toward Washington insiders to defeat Clinton, whose gold-plated establishment resume includes stints as a first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state.

Worried a Trump victory could cause economic and global uncertainty, investors were in full flight from risky assets such as stocks. In overnight trading, S&P 500 index futures fell 5 percent to hit their so-called limit down levels, indicating they would not be permitted to trade any lower until regular U.S. stock market hours on Wednesday.

The Associated Press and Fox News projected that Trump had collected just enough of the 270 state-by-state electoral votes needed to win a four-year term that starts on Jan. 20, taking battleground states where presidential elections are traditionally decided.

CNN reported Clinton had called Trump to concede the election.

Trump, who at 70 will be the oldest first-term U.S. president, came out on top after a bitter and divisive campaign that focused largely on the character of the candidates and whether they could be trusted to serve as the country’s 45th president.

Television networks projected Republicans would retain control of the U.S. House of Representatives, where all 435 seats were up for grabs. In the U.S. Senate, the party also put up an unexpectedly tough fight to protect its majority in the U.S. Senate.

— Staff and wire reports

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