“The American people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn emails,” Bernie Sanders said in Tuesday night’s Democratic presidential debate. “Enough of the emails.” Then he shook hands with Hillary Clinton.

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton shake hands after his “Enough of email” comment at Oct. 13 debate. Photo via CNN and Twitter
That CNN moment — see #EnoughEmails — was the most recorded of the night, according to an analysis of more than 30,000 anonymous TiVo households across the United States.

Even @DamnEmails has its own Twitter feed.

TiVo listed these top moments of the 2015 CNN Facebook Democratic Debate

#1 – Sanders: “Enough of the emails!”
9:49 p.m.: Sanders interjects following Clinton’s response to yet another question about her email server: “Enough of the emails! Let’s talk about the real issues facing America!”

#2 – Sanders: “The planet we leave our kids and grandchildren may well not be inhabitable.”
9:41 p.m.: Sanders responds to Cooper’s question, “What is the greatest national security threat facing the United States?”: “The scientific community is telling us if we do not address the global process of climate change, transform our energy system away from fossil fuel to sustainable energy, the planet that we’re going to be leaving our kids and our grandchildren may well not be inhabitable. That is a major crisis.”

#3 – Sanders: “We have to think through this war on drugs.”
10:45 p.m.: Sanders responds to a question regarding Nevada’s upcoming measure to legalize recreational marijuana, saying “I suspect I would vote yes … And I would vote yes because I am seeing in this country too many lives being destroyed for non-violent offenses. We have a criminal justice system that lets CEOs on Wall Street walk away, and yet we are imprisoning or giving jail sentences to young people who are smoking marijuana. I think we have to think through this war on drugs which has done an enormous amount of damage.”

#4 – Sanders: “But the only way we can get things done is by having millions of people coming together.”
10:47 p.m.: Sanders is asked if he will have the same difficulty Obama has had getting Republicans to compromise. Sanders says that Republicans have been total obstructionists: “Every effort that he has made, that some of us have made, they have said ‘No, no, no!'” He then continues to call on the nation to come together to force change: “But the only way we can get things done is by having millions of people coming together. If we want free tuition at public colleges and universities, millions of young people are going to have to demand it, and give the Republicans an offer they can’t refuse.”

#5 – O’Malley: “Talk to your young people under 30 because you’ll never find among them people that want to bash immigrants or people that want to deny rights to gay couples.”
10:58 p.m.: In his closing remarks, Governor O’Malley concludes: “I truly believe that we are standing on the threshold of a new era of American progress … talk to our young people under 30 because you’ll never find among them people that want to bash immigrants or people that want to deny rights to gay couples. That tells me we are moving to a more connected, generous, and compassionate place, and we need to speak to the goodness within our country.”

#6 – Clinton: “I think being the first woman president would be quite a change from the presidents we’ve had up until this point, including President Obama.”
10:25 p.m.: When Cooper says, “Name one way your administration wouldn’t be a third term of President Obama,” Clinton responds, “Well, I think that’s pretty obvious. I think being the first woman president would be quite a change from the presidents we’ve had up until this point, including President Obama.”

#7 – Sanders: “We need the American people to know what’s going on in Washington in a way that today they do not know.”
10:28 p.m.: Cooper asks Sanders, “You don’t hear a lot of Democratic presidential candidates talking about revolution. What do you mean?” Sanders says, “What I mean is that we need to have one of the larger voter turnouts in the world, not one of the lowest. We need to raise public consciousness. We need the American people to know what’s going on in Washington in a way that today they do not know.”

#8 – Clinton: “If you work hard and you do your part, you should be able to get ahead and stay ahead.”
11:01 p.m.: Clinton’s closing remarks: “My mission as president will be to raise incomes for hard-working middle-class families and to make sure that we get back to the basic bargain I was raised with: If you work hard and you do your part, you should be able to get ahead and stay ahead. Please join me in this campaign. Please come and make it clear that America’s best days are still ahead. Thank you very much.”

#9 – Sanders: “I think that there is profound frustration all over this country with establishment politics.”
10:36 p.m.: After Clinton deflects a question about her family’s seemingly dynastic involvement in politics, Sanders chimes in, “I think that there is profound frustration all over this country with establishment politics. I am the only candidate running for president who is not a billionaire, who has raised substantial sums of money, and I do not have a super PAC.”

#10 – Clinton: “Probably the Republicans.”
10:53 p.m.: To the question, “Which political enemy that you made during your political career are you most proud of?” Clinton’s partisan response draws laughter and applause: “Well, in addition to the NRA, the health insurance companies, the drug companies, the Iranians … probably the Republicans.”

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