Philadelphia hip-hop star Meek Mill appears close to beating the rap — or at least getting sprung early from a medium-security prison.

“In a surprising turn, prosecutors [said] they are not opposed to allowing the hip-hop star to appeal his probation-violation sentence from outside a jail cell,” reports Vulture.com. “It’s the first sign of good news for Mill and his defense team since he was turned down for parole late last year.”

But it’s bad news for the black judge who took heat for sending the rapper back to prison for two to four years.

Philly.com last month told how Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Genece E. Brinkley endured months of criticism in silence.

“Brinkley’s newly retained attorney, A. Charles Peruto Jr., defended her decision to revoke Mill’s probation last year and decried tactics by the rapper’s legal and publicity teams to drag her personal and professional life under a microscope,” the local newspaper said.

“Peruto specifically denied allegations that Brinkley tried to extort personal favors from Mill and that she lashed out with a two- to four-year prison sentence when he refused.”

Mill has been a focus of mass-incarceration foes Al Sharpton and other celebrities including football players.

“We will always stand by and support Meek Mill, both as he attempts to right this wrongful sentence and then in returning to his musical career,” Jay Z wrote on Facebook.

How did Mill end up behind bars?

Said CBS Sports: “Brinkley’s decision to incarcerate Mill came after she found him in violation of his probation four times in eight years, mostly for failing drug tests or disobeying the judge’s ban on out-of-state travel without prior approval. She revoked his probation in November after another failed drug screening and two unrelated arrests – the first in St. Louis during a fight at an airport, and later in New York City for reckless driving.”

Rolling Stone noted that over the past decade-plus, the rapper has spent an estimated $30 million on legal defense.

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