Clint Eastwood on the set of "Richard Jewell"
Clint Eastwood (right) on the set of “Richard Jewell.” Courtesy Warner Bros.

A Los Angeles federal judge Friday denied a bid by a company that controls Clint Eastwood’s trademarks to put a temporary halt to the use of the actor-director’s name and likeness by several CBD companies in promoting their products.

CBD stands for Cannabidiol, an ingredient of marijuana.

Attorneys for the trademark-controlling company Garrapata sued the companies Wednesday and applied for a temporary restraining order a day later. Eastwood’s lawyers also brought a separate lawsuit against three CBD manufacturers, alleging they posted online articles falsely claiming the 90-year-old Academy Award-winning filmmaker endorsed their products.

In a written order filed in Los Angeles federal court, U.S. District Judge Cormac Carney denied the TRO request because the defendants had apparently not received adequate notice of the action and did not have opportunity to be heard.

The judge ordered both sides to meet and propose a schedule for the CBD companies’ opposition to the TRO and the plaintiffs’ reply. A court hearing could be scheduled if necessary, Carney wrote.

The suit filed on behalf of Eastwood names companies based in California, Arizona, Michigan and Florida, asserting that they are using programming code to insert his name into online search results for CBD products, tricking consumers into thinking the “Dirty Harry” star is endorsing them.

The second complaint arises “from an online scam that uses a false, defamatory and wholly fabricated `news article’ about Mr. Eastwood to promote and sell cannabidiol products,” according to Eastwood’s lawyers.

The fraudulent `article’ prominently features photographs of Eastwood and references a fabricated interview with the actor in which he “touts his purported line of CBD products,” his attorneys wrote. “Like many of his most famous characters, Mr. Eastwood is not afraid to confront wrongdoing and hold accountable those that try to illegally profit off his name or likeness.”

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