On the night the Golden Globe Awards returned to the airwaves following last year’s scandal over diversity and ethical standards in the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, “The Fablemans” — Steven Spielberg’s largely autobiographical movie about a young boy who dreams of becoming a filmmaker — captured the Best Motion Picture, Drama award, while Spielberg himself won best director for the movie.

“The Banshees of Inisherin,” which went into the evening with a leading eight nominations, won Best Picture, Musical or Comedy, among its three victories on the night, while “Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio” won the statue for Best Animated Motion Picture.

Other major winners on a night where the stars came back and some luster was returned to what has long been one of Hollywood’s glitziest affairs were Austin Butler as best actor in a drama in “Elvis”; Cate Blanchett as best actress in a drama for “Tar”; and Colin Farrell for best actor in a motion picture musical or comedy in “The Banshees of Inisherin.”

Meanwhile, the Golden Globe for best actress in a motion picture musical or comedy went to Michelle Yeoh for her role in “Everything Everywhere All at Once.”

On the television side, HBO’s “House of the Dragon” captured the trophy for best drama series, while ABC’s “Abbott Elementary” (a three-time winner overall on Tuesday) won for best musical or comedy series, and HBO’s “The White Lotus” took home the honor for best limited series, anthology series or motion picture made for television.

Kevin Costner won for best actor in a TV drama for his role in the Western “Yellowstone,” but could not accept in person, as he was sheltering in place in Santa Barbara following the recent heavy rains in Southern California.

For her role in “Euphoria,” Zendaya won the award for best actress in a television drama series, while Quinta Brunson of “Abbott Elementary” won for best actress in a musical or comedy series, and Jeremy Allen White captured the Golden Globe as best actor in a musical or comedy TV series for his role in “The Bear.”

Comedian Jerrod Carmichael hosted Tuesday night’s show, which returned to NBC and to the Beverly Hilton in a coast-to-coast telecast. It had been banished from the airwaves last year following the HFPA scandal over the organization’s long-term lack of diversity as well as ethical issues involving influence over nominations.

In his opening monologue, Carmichael began the evening with a joke about the scandal, saying he was tapped for the hosting role “because I’m Black.”

There were few other references during the broadcast to last year’s scandal, until HFPA President Helen Hoehne, near the end, addressed it directly by saying, “This has been a year of tremendous change for our organization.”

“We’re proud of the work we have done, the progress we have made and the journey we are on,” Hoehne said. “We commit to continue strengthening our partnership with Hollywood and with the worldwide fans who celebrate like we do the best in film and television.

“We will continue to support groups that amplify a variety of voices and continue to add representation to our organization from around the world as we did this past year.”

Last year’s awards were presented in a small-scale event with no live stream or telecast.

But after a year in which the HFPA overhauled its leadership, bylaws and membership — adding more than 100 new voters to its ranks, more than doubling the organization’s previous size — the Globes were back.

So were many of Hollywood’s elite.

Hilary Swank, Jennifer Hudson and Jenna Ortega were among the presenters, along with Claire Danes, Cole Hauser, Harvey Guillén, Henry Golding, Glen Powell, Jay Ellis, Jennifer Coolidge, Letitia Wright, Mo Brings Plenty, Regina Hall and Salma Hayek Pinault.

They joined Quentin Tarantino, Jamie Lee Curtis, Billy Porter, Ana De Armas, Ana Gasteyer, Colman Domingo, Michaela Jaé Rodriguez, Natasha Lyonne, Nicole Byer, Niecy Nash-Betts and Tracy Morgan.

Eddie Murphy was presented with the HFPA’s Cecil B. DeMille Award recognizing his contributions to the film industry. Producer Ryan Murphy received the Carol Burnett Award for his award-winning career in television.

According to the HFPA, the Globe nominees were chosen by 96 members and 103 international voters who were “recruited from international industry organizations, well-known foreign film festivals and journalism professionals.”

The organization stated that voters represent 62 countries, and the voting body is now 52% female and 51.5% racially and ethnically diverse — with 19.5% Latinx, 12% Asian, 10% Black and 10% Middle Eastern.

Here is a complete list of the winners:

Best Motion Picture, Drama

“The Fabelmans” (Universal Pictures)

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

“The Banshees of Inisherin” (Searchlight Pictures)

Best Motion Picture, Animated

“Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio” (Netflix)

Best Director, Motion Picture

Steven Spielberg, “The Fabelmans”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama

Austin Butler, “Elvis”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

Cate Blanchett, “Tár”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Colin Farrell, “The Banshees of Inisherin”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Michelle Yeoh, “Everything Everywhere All at Once”

Best Supporting Actor, Motion Picture

Ke Huy Quan, “Everything Everywhere All at Once”

Best Supporting Actress, Motion Picture

Angela Bassett, “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever”

Best Picture, Foreign Language

“Argentina, 1985” (Argentina)

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

“The Banshees of Inisherin” (Searchlight Pictures) – Martin McDonagh

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

“Babylon” (Paramount Pictures) – Justin Hurwitz

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“Naatu Naatu” from “RRR” (Variance Films) – Kala Bhairava, M. M. Keeravani, Rahul Sipligunj

Best Television Series, Drama

“House of the Dragon” (HBO)

Best Television Series, Musical or Comedy

“Abbott Elementary” (ABC)

Best Limited Series, Anthology Series or a Motion Picture made for Television

“The White Lotus” (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Drama

Kevin Costner, “Yellowstone”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Drama

Zendaya, “Euphoria”

Best Actress in a TV Series, Musical or Comedy

Quinta Brunson, “Abbott Elementary”

Best Actor in a TV Series, Musical or Comedy

Jeremy Allen White, “The Bear”

Best Supporting Actor, Television

Tyler James Williams, “Abbott Elementary”

Best Supporting Actress, Television

Julia Garner, “Ozark”

Best Performance by an Actor, Limited Series, Anthology Series or Motion Picture made for Television

Evan Peters, “Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story”

Best Performance by an Actress, Limited Series, Anthology Series or a Motion Picture made for Television

Amanda Seyfried, “The Dropout”

Best Performance by an Actress in Supporting Role, Limited Series, Anthology Series or a Motion Picture made for Television

Jennifer Coolidge, “The White Lotus”

Best Performance by an Actor in Supporting Role, Limited Series, Anthology Series or a Motion Picture made for Television

Paul Walter Hauser, “Black Bird”

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