Winding mountain road. Not the one where motorcycle rider was killed. Courtesy The Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
Winding mountain road. Not the one where motorcycle rider was killed. Courtesy The Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority announced Thursday it has closed escrow on 96 acres of pristine land in the Santa Monica Mountains.

The $2.1 million purchase of 10 parcels of open space adjacent to City of Calabasas-owned Creekside Park contains large stands of coast live oaks, coastal sage scrub and chaparral. At a headwaters of the Los Angeles River, an unnamed tributary crosses the property to a confluence with the Dry Creek Canyon, which flows into Calabasas Creek.

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl championed the protection of the property, which comprises a north-south oriented ridgeline visible from several vantage points in the Santa Monica Mountains.

Kuehl offered $1 million in Los Angeles County Proposition A funds as matching funds. The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy granted the remaining $1.1 million in Proposition 1 funds.

“Kuehl’s leadership made possible the expansion of public parkland in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area to the urban edge and permanent protection of the Scenic Old Topanga Corridor,” said Joseph T. Edmiston, executive officer of the conservation authority.

“The acquisition of these pristine 96 acres is one more vital step in protecting the incredible natural environment that our county residents are lucky enough to call home,” Kuehl said. “I feel fortunate to have been a part of several key acquisitions and I’m committed to making sure that our natural habitat and open space are protected for our children and grandchildren.”

Conservation of the property will permanently protect water resources, combat climate change and expand recreational opportunities in the Santa Monica Mountains, according to the MRCA.

–City News Service 

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