Federal agents Monday raided the New York office of President Donald Trump’s personal attorney, who is targeted in a Los Angeles lawsuit by porn actress Stormy Daniels over $130,000 he paid to prevent her from discussing her alleged decade-ago affair with Trump.

The raid of Michael Cohen’s office came on the heels of renewed court filings in Los Angeles by Daniels’ attorney, who wants to depose Trump and Cohen about the alleged 2006 affair and the 2016 non-disclosure agreement, which Daniels claims is invalid because Trump never signed it.

“An enormous amount of misplaced faith has been placed on (Cohen’s) shoulders (in my opinion),” Daniels’ attorney, Michael Avenatti, wrote on Twitter following news of the FBI raid. “If he (Cohen) does not hold up, this could end very badly for (Trump) and others.”

The New York Times reported that FBI agents seized records from Cohen’s office pertaining to the $130,000 payment to Daniels. Cohen has publicly admitted paying her, saying he used his own money and paid Daniels without Trump’s knowledge.

Cohen’s lawyer, Stephen Ryan, issued a statement confirming the FBI raid, which he called “completely inappropriate and unnecessary.”

“It resulted in the unnecessary seizure of protected attorney-client communications between a lawyer and his clients,” Ryan said. “These government tactics are also wrong because Mr. Cohen has cooperated completely with all government entities, including providing thousands of non-privileged documents to the Congress and sitting for depositions under oath.”

On Sunday, Avenatti filed a 64-page motion in federal court in Los Angeles, seeking to depose Trump and Cohen for two hours each about the alleged affair with Daniels and the $130,000 payment. A federal judge in Los Angeles had earlier rejected a similar request as premature.

Last week, however, attorneys for Trump and Cohen filed a motion trying to force the case into private arbitration — a move Avenatti claims opened the door for him to re-file his request for depositions.

“Now that a motion to compel arbitration has been filed, as plaintiff predicted, and plaintiff’s return date on the motion has arrived, plaintiff’s motion is ripe for decision,” Avenatti wrote in the motion.

In the court papers, Avenatti contends the depositions and associated requests for documents are essential to oppose efforts to force the case into arbitration. As such, he asked a judge to put the Trump/Cohen arbitration motion on hold until a decision is reached on the deposition requests.

Avenatti filed a separate motion Monday opposing the bid for arbitration.

The White House has repeatedly denied Daniels’ allegations that she and Trump had an affair beginning in 2006, shortly after the birth of his son, Barron. Speaking to reporters aboard Air Force One last week, Trump denied any knowledge of the $130,000 Daniels was paid by Cohen after she signed the non-disclosure agreement in October 2016, days before the presidential election.

Asked why Cohen made the payment, Trump responded, “You’ll have to ask Michael Cohen. Michael is my attorney. You’ll have to ask Michael.”

Trump also said he did not know where the money came from.

Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, is suing Trump claiming the “hush agreement” she signed in 2016 — leading to the $130,000 payment — is invalid because Trump himself never signed it. Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, claims in her lawsuit that she is identified in the “hush agreement” by the pseudonym “Peggy Peterson,” while Trump used the name “David Dennison.”

Avenatti later amended the lawsuit to include a defamation claim against Cohen over his contentions that Daniels is lying about the affair and her contention that she was physically threatened by an unknown man after coming forward with her story.

In interviews Monday, Avenatti said he will soon release a composite sketch of the man Daniels claims threatened her. On his Twitter page Sunday, he posted a photo of Daniels working with forensic artist Lois Gibson to develop a sketch.

Avenatti has been critical of Trump’s claim that he was unaware of the $130,000 payment to Daniels, suggesting that Cohen was being set up as a fall guy in the case. He said Trump’s public contention that he knew nothing of the payment could open Cohen to legal problems, including the possibility the payment could be considered an illegal campaign contribution.

According to Avenatti’s latest court papers, a hearing on the request for depositions has been set for 10 a.m. May 7 in downtown Los Angeles.

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