Dockweiler State Beach. Photo via LA County Department of Beaches and Harbors

The region’s heat wave entered its second week Monday, with highs again forecast to hit triple-digit territory in some L.A. County communities, and forecasters said the above-normal heat will extend into next week, bringing danger to the elderly, pets and kids.

The highest temperatures in the Los Angeles County area this week will be between 108 and 112 degrees in the Antelope Valley, with the mercury inching up to triple digits downtown and even the 80s at the beaches.

But things will really sizzle in the desert resort of Palm Springs as temperatures are expected to hit 121 Tuesday, just a bit short of the area’s 123 record.

In addition to the heat, smog may present breathing problems across the region.

“Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside,” the NWS urged. “When possible, reschedule strenuous activities to ear morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Wear lightweight and loose-fitting clothing when possible and drink plenty of water.”

NWS forecasters said the high temperatures are creating a high risk of heat-related illnesses. And they warned that temperatures can quickly rise to lethal levels inside parked vehicles, even with windows cracked open, meaning that children, seniors and pets must never be left in parked vehicles in high temperatures.

A heat advisory was in effect in the Los Angeles County portion of the San Gabriel Mountains until late morning Monday, followed by a more severe excessive heat warning that will be in force until 9 p.m. Wednesday, according to the NWS.

“Strong high pressure building across the southwestern states will cause temperatures to climb well above normal in many parts of interior southwest California today and through the middle of next week,” according to the National Weather Service.

The same upper ridge causing the above-average heat caused the marine layer to become very shallow, allowing dense fog to develop along the coast and linger into late morning.

The highest temperatures this week will be between 108 and 112 degrees in the Antelope Valley.

A heat advisory was in effect in the Los Angeles County portion of the San Gabriel Mountains until 11 a.m., when a more severe excessive heat warning kicked in, remaining in force until 9 p.m. Wednesday, according to the NWS.

In the Antelope Valley, an excessive heat warning will be in effect until 9 p.m. Wednesday. Along the L.A. County coast, in beach cities, in metropolitan L.A., the downtown area and the Hollywood Hills, a heat advisory will be in effect from 11 a.m. Tuesday to 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Also scheduled to be in effect until 9 p.m. Wednesday is a heat advisory in the Santa Monica Mountain Recreational Area and in the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and San Gabriel valleys.

Los Angeles County health officials issued a heat alert that will be in effect through Friday in the Antelope Valley and through Wednesday in the San Fernando Valley. The heat alert will be in effect Tuesday and Wednesday in Pomona and the Santa Clarita Valley.

Adding to the concern is the poor air quality. County health officials warned that air quality will be unhealthy for sensitive people in the San Gabriel and Santa Clarita valleys throughout the day. Health officials urged people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions to minimize outdoor activity.

Schools were also urged to limit outdoor activity for children with sensitive health conditions.

The NWS forecast a mix of sunny and partly cloudy skies in Los Angeles County Monday and highs of 76 at LAX; 79 in Avalon; 85 in Long Beach; 92 in Burbank and San Gabriel; 93 on Mount Wilson; 94 in Pasadena; 100 in Woodland Hills; 101 in Saugus; and 109 in Palmdale and Lancaster.

Sunny skies were forecast in Orange County, along with highs of  71 in Laguna Beach; 72 in San Clemente; 75 in Newport Beach; 87 in Anaheim and Irvine; 89 in Mission Viejo; 90 in Fullerton; and 92 in Yorba Linda.

Temperatures will remain high over the next several days, with small dips expected later in the week.

–City News Service

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